Clocking up the Miles with Peta Miller

Peta Miller on completing her challenge, getting some ‘miles behind the brush’ and reviving old favourites:

FINISHED…..Finally finished the last picture on Sunday. What can I say…. it’s definitely been an adventure. I set out to do something really different from my own work which is mainly abstract and about the land…especially remote Australian areas. So for this project small was already a challenge for me as well as the time frame. I then decided to work in a more representational style which was actually quite fun. As I have just returned from overseas I chose two favourite places but very different places to paint. Broadway in Manhattan and Marrakech, Morocco. This took care of the first 20 and the last 10 are of home.

I found despite pushing myself in another direction I couldn’t change the essentials. Try as I might to be a less is more artist, I seem destined to be a more is more one! With the hours in the studio I discovered how much you can actually do if you set your mind to it. I am always saying to students that at the end of the day it’s the ‘miles behind the brush’ that make a difference. And it’s true, the more we paint the more we paint…and learn about what we can do with paint.

Another bonus was listening to my entire record and cd collection…reviving old favourites I hadn’t listened to in some time like Fleetwood Mac, Steely Dan, Supertramp, Seals and Crofts……..but it was the Mamas and the Papas that got me over the line. So its backings today, photographing then I am done.

Thanks and good luck to those still creating……….although I may be the last.

See you on the big night.

Peta Miller

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7: Chord

the simultaneous sounding of a group of musical notes, usually three or more in number

http://forums.chiffandfipple.com/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=67719It’s not a secret, I am a muso at heart. It comes from learning violin from an early age and continuing on through TEE music. It’s a bit of a tragedy really that the old violin only gets dusted off once in a blue moon.

So why am I delving into my musical past you ask?
The truth of it is, I feel there is an awful lot of synchronicity between music and art. I know, not exactly a ground-breaking revelation. Artists have been waxing lyrical about this for centuries. In fact, isn’t the foghorn picture one of the first examples of this from back in the 1920’s?
http://aesthetic.gregcookland.com/2009/09/doveokeeffe-circles-of-influence-at.html
To me it is a wonderful thing to look at a piece of art and unpick the layers, just like unpicking the individual notes in a chord.
You have the base note, possibly the intent behind the art. The deep emotions connected with the artist and their production. The base note is one which sets the mood, the tone of the piece. Much like we talk about perfumes, it is the base note that sticks with us the longest. As an artist myself (if amateur) it is exactly these base notes that are the most important to me. If I can make someone feel something through my art I have succeeded. As one of my dear friends said to me once “I don’t care if someone doesn’t like what I have created, as long as they have a feeling about it. Nice is not a word I want to hear”.
Next up the chord would be the middle notes. I view these as the form and materials that the artist uses. The paints, or clay. Chalk or fabric. What is it that is going to bring this creation to life? What colours are going to be used? What is the connection between those colours and emotions?
And at last there is the top notes. The sweetest of them all and for me, I like to think of these as the finishing layers of the art. Possibly the final touches and detail on a painting, or the glaze on a piece of clay work. This top note is what you see when you look closely. When you step right up to a painting and look at the brush strokes and the little dabs of colour that might have otherwise escaped your attention.
After picking to pieces the chord, after contemplating the connection, I certainly have convinced myself that this connection is most certainly a strong one.
Every action of our lives touches on some chord that will vibrate in eternity.
Sean O’Casey

26: Conductor

A person who directs an orchestra or chorus, communicating to the performers by motions of a baton or the hands his or her interpretation of the music.

We all know the importance of the conductor’s baton. A small yet revered object with the power to guide a group of people. Impossibly light and delicately balanced it can convey the ferocity of a sfortzando, to the delicate sweetness of a dolcissimo.

Imagine yourself sitting amongst the performers, perched on the edge of your seat, your eyes focused on the baton’s movements. There you sit, behind a stand laden with sheet music and pencils, instrument in hand, poised and ready to play. Breath held, waiting for the baton to fall…

Perhaps in Our orchestra the baton takes the shape of a paint brush. We watch as the brush begins its fluid movements. It strokes the canvas, painting the music imagined in the conductor’s mind. Colour splashes, bringing forth shapes and dimensions, stories and feelings.

Is the music the eternal rhythms of nature, earthly, mirroring the seasons of life? Is it more intimate, our emotions and experiences ebbing and flowing around us?

Music is expression, as is beauty created with colour and form.

This project began with an idea, a simple tune in a person’s mind that has morphed into a symphony of colour and shape. This idea has been taken from a conversation and turned into a passion. A passion that is growing day by day through commitment…